Update: The latest news on the Bank of England’s Polymer Banknotes

The Polymer banknotes are still catching the headlines this week after a £5 note was found with a mysterious secret message.

Two different people, who thought they had found the rare Jane Austen £5 note worth more than £20,000, have come forward so far.

The message on the banknote stated ‘Look for serial number AL22171910’ instead of a classic quote from Pride and Prejudice, Emma or Mansfield Park.

The message on the banknote states ‘Look for serial number AL22171910’

However, artist Graham Short’s gallery have denied the stunt is anything to do with them.

Four special £5 notes, engraved with a tiny portrait of author Jane Austen, were put into circulation by Mr Graham Short late last year and could fetch more than £20,000 at auction.

So could it be another Willy Wonka style golden ticket hunt?

Both findings have sparked theories of a copycat engraver offering clues to find other valuable notes – but it could just be someone creating a bit of mischief.

Just one fiver worth more than £20K left to find…

There is still one engraved fiver in circulation left to find by specialist micro-engraver Graham Short. Mr Short came up with the idea of engraving a 5mm portrait of Pride and Prejudice author Jane Austen on the transparent part of the new plastic £5 notes,  to mark the 200th anniversary of one of the best-loved English novelists this year.

Just one fiver worth more than £20K left to find…

The first of four notes featuring art by specialist micro-engraver Graham Short was found in a cafe in South Wales on 5th December while another was found the same month inside a Christmas card in Scotland. The third £5 note was found by a mystery old lady in Eniskillen in Northern Ireland who has donated it to charity.

So that means there is just one more rare £5 note left to find with the handiwork of Birmingham micro-artist Graham Short. It was spent somewhere in England back in December so for those hunting down the last remaining fiver, the serial number to look out for is AM 32 885554.

In other  news… the Bank of England considers the use of Palm Oil

The Bank of England have been considering the use of palm oil as a replacement to animal fat in their polymer banknotes after complaints from vegans and religious groups.

The news that the polymer fiver contained animal fat sparked an online petition last year, calling for the Bank of England to stop using tallow in the production of the notes, which has since attracted more than 136,000 signatures.

However, in February, the Bank of England confirmed that it would stick with animal fat despite the concerns. In a statement, the Bank of England said  “it would be appropriate to keep the £5 polymer note in circulation and to issue the £10 polymer note as planned, in September.”

Palm oil is a type of edible vegetable oil that is derived from the palm fruit. However, switching from the animal fat derivative may prove difficult and is likely to spark protests from environmentalists unless the palm oil can be sustainably sourced.

The Bank of England is now undertaking a consultation to seek the views of the public on options for the future composition of polymer notes, namely the next £20 note and future reprints of the £5 and £10.

Who will feature on the new £20 polymer banknote?

The new £20 polymer banknote is due to enter circulation in 2020 and will feature J.M.W. Turner. Click here to find out more about the £20 note.

The £20 note will be the third banknote made from Polymer, following on from the £5 note featuring Winston Churchill and the £10 note featuring Jane Austen. The £50 note will remain in circulation with the same design and there are currently no plans for them to be issued in polymer.

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4 Responses to Update: The latest news on the Bank of England’s Polymer Banknotes

  1. Lynn says:

    I have 3 £5 notes with consecutive serial numbers. Are there any collectors interested?
    AA12141388
    AA12141389
    AA12141390

  2. karl harrowven says:

    what is all the fuss about animal fats.
    jesus it makes me laugh all these moaning people

  3. Terry McElligott says:

    I am not worried about the use of these controversial notes having traces of oils in the printing or manufacturing process. The only problem I find with them is they are very springy/bendy and it’s tricky trying to stack them in piles when counting up, unlike the paper counterparts.

  4. NGH says:

    Please stop using animal fat and under no circumstances should you use palm oil either!

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